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Archive for June, 2010

I used the “marker blending” or “direct to paper” techniques on all my cards this month. I posted the technique earlier in the month. You can also find it in the Copic forum here

Card #1

Copics used: E31, E33, E50, W1, W7, G02, B00, B02, Y38, YR 16, YR18, R20

Card #2

I also used the “tip to tip” technique to create her blushed cheeks

Copics used: E21, E33, E35, E50, V15, V17, R20, YR16, YR18, C1

Card #3

Copics used: E21, E35, E37, E39, E50, R20, C1, B00, B02, B04, V15, V17, YG11, YG13, Blender

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Until June 27th, enjoy some great sale prices on paper from these companies!  You’ll want to hurry, there are limited quantities available!  To see all the items on sale, just click HERE.

My Mind’s Eye

KI

Me and My Big Ideas

SEI

Tim Holtz

Imaginisce

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Okay – so this month, Ann showed you the Direct To Paper technique. I think I probably use this technique more than any other – I just find it the easiest! 🙂

In my first picture – I used this method to color the watering can. I used the Warm Greys – W5, W3, W1. You can see how I used my darkest shade towards the spout and lightened it up as I went across.

In my second image, I used the Direct to Paper technique when coloring Tilda’s hair and skin. I used E35,E37 and E39 for her hair and E000,E00 and E11 for the skin.

For my third image, I use the direct to paper method and the Tip to Tip method on my little boy image! This is a crimped envelope card I made for my Dad for Father’s day – it will hold a gift card inside. If you’re interested, you can find the tutorial here: Crimped Envelope Card

I have posted the copic colors I used in the gallery at SNS, so you can check there if you are interested.  Also, just a note….all the ribbons used in these cards are from Savvy N Sassy of course!! 🙂 You and find those in the store! 🙂

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Ann’s Copic Tip for June…..

Pick a color and then “build” around it. That way you can keep gray scales the same if you want. I often pick all the colors I’m going to work with first and then color, usually starting with what my biggest area is to color. Then I pick colors to coordinate.

Lisa’s Copic Tip for June…

Digital Printouts….
Copic marker inks will not destroy lines printed out from a laser printer or standard photocopier. This is because they are toner-based devices and the toner is fused to the paper so the alcohol ink from the markers will not destroy it.

Inkjet printouts need to be tested because each printer uses slightly different inks. Testing a printer ink is the same as testing any other inks. Be careful not to get untested ink on the tip of your marker.

**this excerpt taken from the Copic Certification Student Manual 2010-2011.

Hope you find these tips helpful!!   Have fun coloring!! 🙂  Make sure you post your masterpieces to the Savvy n Sassy gallery!! 🙂

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Direct to paper blending.

You will need 3 colors in the same family (same gray scale and about a number apart) to try this out. I used B00, B02, B04

1. Color you image with your lightest color. Make sure to color in circles to avoid streaks. I leave some areas uncolored in my first coat so that when I go over it it will be a lighter area.

2. While it’s still wet, add your darkest color to your “shadow side”. Do this by doing strokes and lifting up your marker at the end of your stroke so the edge has more color than the end of your stroke.

3. Use your lightest color again and go over the image to blend you lines. Thicker papers will take more blending. If it’s not working try using colors that are closer in numbers

4. Keep doing steps 2 and 3 until you get the effect you want

5. You can add your middle color now where you want it. Then use your lightest color to blend it all together.

This takes practice. And I found to start that blues, greens and light browns were the easiest. Reds were the hardest to blend but I got it after lots of practice. That’s the key with Copics, practice.

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Here are Holly’s creations with the fun June kit.  Just click the image above to purchase.

FLOOD 2010
SNS June Ribbon Kit
Craft paper
BG scraps
handmade transparency flower
Onion net
Foam thickers
MM tiny alphas
misc. velvet button
INK

“3” ‘s a CHARM
SNS June Ribbon Kit
Basic Grey paper
Assorted buttons
Love Elsie paper
Tim Holtz tiny staples
Heart-unknown

You Make me Grin
SNS June Ribbon Kit
Basic Grey PPrs
Love Elsie ppr
Yellow cardstock
Apple Net
Prima Flowers

To be YOUNG again
SNS June Ribbon
Unknown bg paper
Assorted flowers
Assorted buttons
Thickers
MM tiny alphas

Look Mama
SNS June Ribbon Kit
SH June Petite paper kit
Blue Alphas-unknown

Kids at PLAY
SNS June Ribbon Kit
SH Petite paper kit
Scrap papers
MM tiny alphas
Other Alphas –Unknown

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As you know, flowers are all the rage in scrapbooking!

Would you like to learn how to make your own pretty  2-layered scallop flowers to use on layouts or cards?  I can show you an easy way! Read on…

SUPPLIES

 

Before you start, gather some simple supplies, as pictured above.

Scallop Circle Punch (mine is by EK Success)   

Paper from which you will  punch 2 scallop circles

Pencil

Scissors

Glue dots

Buttons

Ink

Mod-Podge & paintbrush (optional)

 

 

 Step 1: Punch 2 scallop-edged circles and roughly mark the center of each as seen below. 

STEP #1

Step 2: Using your scissors, cut toward the center alongside of each “scallop-bump” as seen below.

**Stop cutting just a little bit before reaching the center.**

Step #2

Step 3: Using a mini-glue dot, adhere a coordinating or contrasting  button to the center of the flower shape you want as the top layer of your flower.  

Step #3

Step 4.  Apply a mini glue dot to the center of the flower shape that will be the bottom layer of your flower (in photo below, that is the solid blue scallop circle.)

Step #4

Step 5. Now adhere the top scallop circle to the bottom scallop circle using the glue dot you just positioned. Your flower will now look like this:

Step #5

Step 6. Now, give the “petals” some dimension  by gently “curving them” slightly  with your fingers.

Step #6

Step 7.  Add some ink around the edges of your flowers – a little as seen on these 3 flowers, or a lot! Your choice!

Step #7

Step 8. If desired, coat top of  flower (not button) with a layer of mod-podge and allow to dry. This helps the petals hold their shape nicely. Then, once dry,  use a glue dot to adhere the finished flower(s) to your layout or card. Some examples of these flowers used on layouts follow. Thanks for joining me today for this “How To!”

 Examples of Step #8~

“Bond”~ a DT layout created with the May Showers SNS Ribbon Kit 

Photos by Danique Fisher of Century Classic Photography.

Handmade scallop-circle flowers mixed with fussy-cut flowers. Note that some flowers have seed-beads as centres instead of a button. Those beads were sealed in place with Glossy Accents. Note also that "Smooch" pearlized accent ink was used as an accent on both types of flowers.

Handmade flowers from patterned paper mixed with flowers made with magazine pages and sealed with Mod-Podge. Note that some of the flowers are heavily inked, some more minimally.

“Kate and Grace”~ a layout created for a Challenge.

Photo by Danique Fisher of Century Classic Photography.

"Precious Face" layout created for a recent SNS Forum Challenge. Photo Credit: Tammy Pyette. Handmade flowers here were mixed with a selection of Prima blooms. Tiny scraps of ribbon were used as "leaves."

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